Meowbean

The art of art, the glory of expression and the sunshine of the light of letters is simplicity. Nothing is better than simplicity.
-Walt Whitman

One need not believe in Pallas Athena, the virgin goddess, to be overwhelmed by the Parthenon. Similarly, a man who rejects all dogmas, all theologies and all religious formulations of beliefs may still find Genesis the sublime book par excellence. Experiences and aspirations of which intimations may be found in Plato, Nietzsche, and Spinoza have found their most evocative expression in some sacred books. Since the Renaissance, Shakespeare, Rembrandt, Mozart, and a host of others have shown that this religious dimension can be experienced and communicated apart from any religious context. But that is no reason for closing my heart to Job’s cry, or to Jeremiah’s, or to the Second Isaiah. I do not read them as mere literature; rather, I read Sophocles and Shakespeare with all my being, too.

—Walter Kaufmann (via observando)

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I… I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.

—Robert Frost (via shaktilover)

Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris?
Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior.

Catullus 85 

"I hate and I love. Why do I do this, perhaps you ask? / I do not know, but I feel that it is done to me and I am crucified." 

(via didoofcarthage)

(via classicsenthusiast)

oupacademic:

Telemachos stands to the left holding two spears, reproaching his mother. She sits mournfully on a chair, head bowed and legs crossed in a pose canonical for Penelope. The partially completed weaving shows a border of two winged horses (Pegasos?), a winged god (Hermes?), and a winged sphinx. Athenian red-figure cup, c. 440 BC, by the Penelope Painter. Museo Archeologico, Chiusi, Italy; Erich Lessing / Art Resource, NY
From The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Barry B. Powell.

oupacademic:

Telemachos stands to the left holding two spears, reproaching his mother. She sits mournfully on a chair, head bowed and legs crossed in a pose canonical for Penelope. The partially completed weaving shows a border of two winged horses (Pegasos?), a winged god (Hermes?), and a winged sphinx. Athenian red-figure cup, c. 440 BC, by the Penelope Painter. Museo Archeologico, Chiusi, Italy; Erich Lessing / Art Resource, NY

From The Odyssey by Homer, translated by Barry B. Powell.